Skip to main content

I Got A Hearing Aid!

Last summer I went to get my hearing checked after a couple of years, and it turned out my left ear had gone worse. It had happened so gradually I hadn't even noticed. I had my doubts, but never really believed it until I saw my audiogram on paper. I've now lost the high pitched noises, like bird singing, and struggle to hear people in crowds. After the results last summer I went to see an ENT, and told him I need a hearing aid. He, at first, said I was a borderline case, and doubted whether I needed a hearing aid since my right ear was perfectly fine. But then he took a look at my previous audiograms and figured if my hearing continued to deteriorate at this speed, it's better to get a hearing aid sooner rather than later, and so he put me down for one. Since I wasn't an acute case, I needed to wait about six months to get to my actual hearing aid appointment.

That appointment was on the last day of January. Since I still had an infection in both of my ears, we were unable to test my hearing and make a mould of my ear canal, but I did get to pick a color for my hearing aid and it was ordered for me. My appointment for a hearing test and mould making was moved to the following week, this week, and fortunately my ear infection had ceased from my left ear. My audiogram showed little to no change to last summer, and I was also pleasantly surprised that my hearing aid had already arrived! I'm now wearing it with a receiver in my ear, a very basic one, until I get my own personalised ear piece in about a month.


The first time I tried it on everything, including my own voice, sounded like talking to a microphone. With a few adjustments we were able to minimise that. And then I started noticing how I can pick up consonants better than before, especially the S's sounded sharp and clear. I put all my new documents and things to a plastic bag and it ruffled so loud. Did they always make that much noise?

I now have a month to get adjusted to living with my new piece of accessory before I get the final receiver. So far I'm liking this thing. It's way smaller than I thought, practically invisible. I wouldn't have minded a bigger one, either, but granted, this one is pretty sweet. I'll update you guys later with more experience.

Before I left my audiologist's office, she played me bird singing from her computer with the hearing aid off and on. When it was on, I could hear the birds :)


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

What I Want You to Know About Me and My Life with Meniere's Disease

If you know someone with Meniere's disease, you should read this. If you know me, and are a part of my life, then you should definitely read this.

1. It's completely fine to ask me about anything related to my condition! I would rather have you ask than make assumptions. MD is not a sensitive subject to me, and I'm happy to fill in the gaps!

2. My condition is permanent. My hearing loss is permanent. Please don't ask me a year from now if my ear is all better - it won't be. There's no cure for MD, and this is something I'm stuck with until there is one.

3. If/when I say I can't hear you, I mean it. Please accommodate to that, and speak up, or write or type what you need to say to me. Or, if you know Finnish or American sign language, you can sign to me ;)

4. When I have vertigo, please know that it's quite debilitating. If I ask you to drive, it literally means my world is spinning out of control and you do not want me operating heavy machinery. My…

Meniere's Disease Symptoms

Meniere's disease is different with everyone, that much we all know. However, there are a variety of symptoms that everyone with MD experiences at least sometimes. Below I have listed common symptoms that occur before, during and after attacks / between attacks, and I have underlined everything that I am experiencing during those stages on a regular basis. All of the information I have gathered in this post, can be found from Vestibular Disorders Association's (VEDA) website, which is an excellent source of information. This post is not sponsored.

BEFORE AN ATTACK:
balance disturbancedizziness, lightheadednessheadache, increased ear pressurehearing loss or tinnitus increasesound sensitivityvague feeling of uneasiness DURING AN ATTACK: spontaneous, violent vertigofluctuating hearing lossear fullness (aural fullness) and/or tinnitusanxiety, feardiarrheablurry vision or eye jerkingnausea and vomitingcold sweat, palpitations or rapid pulsetrembling AFTER AN ATTACK / BETWEEN ATTACKS: …

What I Can't Do With Meniere's Disease

Over the years I've come to some realisations about things I'm no longer able to do due to having Meniere's disease. Before you read any further, please remind yourself that this disease is different with everyone, and what's not working for me might be working for someone else. This post is also not me complaining about things I've had to give up. I'm just presenting some facts here :)


Rollercoasters. Ah, I used to love going to amusement parks and riding rollercoasters and other rides. I LOVE amusement parks. Now, unfortunately, my balance goes way off if I get on a ride, so I no longer have to spend crazy amounts of money on those wrist bands...

Walk down the stairs without holding onto the banister. I still have good days when I can just run down the stairs with no problems, but most of the time I need to hold onto something. If it's dark, I definitely have to be careful on the stairs.

Function well without proper sleep. I need my sleep, I really do, or I …